A Talk to Teachers by James Baldwin

James Baldwin was a black civil rights leader during the 1960s. His essay, “A Talk to Teachers,” discussed the white conspiracy to destroy the black man’s self-image.

Channeling Ralph Waldo Emerson, Baldwin begins:

The paradox of education is precisely this – that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated.  The purpose of education, finally, is to create in a person the ability to look at the world for himself, to make his own decisions, to say to himself this is black or this is white, to decide for himself whether there is a God in heaven or not.  To ask questions of the universe, and then learn to live with those questions, is the way he achieves his own identity.  But no society is really anxious to have that kind of person around.  What societies really, ideally, want is a citizenry which will simply obey the rules of society.

Anyone who doubts that men are oppressed in America should read his excellent essay, “A Talk to Teachers,” and substitute “men” “for Negro.”

Now if I were a teacher in this school, or any Negro school, and I was dealing with Negro children, who were in my care only a few hours of every day and would then return to their homes and to the streets, children who have an apprehension of their future which with every hour grows grimmer and darker, I would try to teach them -  I would try to make them know – that those streets, those houses, those dangers, those agonies by which they are surrounded, are criminal.  I would try to make each child know that these things are the result of a criminal conspiracy to destroy him.  I would teach him that if he intends to get to be a man, he must at once decide that his is stronger than this conspiracy and they he must never make his peace with it.  And that one of his weapons for refusing to make his peace with it and for destroying it depends on what he decides he is worth.  I would teach him that there are currently very few standards in this country which are worth a man’s respect.

Real talk.

Read more: “A Talk to Teachers.”

  • Rob

    I read Invisible Man a while ago. Recommended. If people read Kesey, Heller, Orwell, Salinger, Heimingway, etc…by the time they were 18, game forums/websites wouldn’t be necessary to teach men what the “red pill” is. Which would be a good thing, because those places are full of quasi intellectuals.